This is a great story! Full of great information. …

This is a great story! Full of great information. My pit bull has always been good with cats. He even snuggles with my parents cats lol. I'm glad your pitty Was able to get used to the cats. I love happy endings! Especially when pit bulls are involved! Keep spreading the good word of pit bulls!
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Crowd-Sourced Canine Behavior Study

Crowd-Sourced Canine Behavior Study
Join a Historic Study of Canine Behavior before January 15, 2018!

How does this sound: answer a few questions about your own dog(s) behavior and in doing so, contribute to helping save the lives of other pooches in shelters? At the same time, you might get an insight into some of the issues dogs can have. Possibly you might also become more aware of your own dog’s quirks? I did it for my dogs, Maisie and Wanda Weimaraner and it was kind of a no-brainer!

Who Created This Study?
Dr. Nicholas H. Dodman, who retired from the Cumming vet school at Tufts University, has been pursuing independent canine behavior research at the Center for Canine Behavior Studies that he co-founded in 2014. He created this canine behavior study to figure out the things dogs do that cause people to give them up to shelters. In the process, Dr. Dodman also wants to identify the most effective ways to deal with solving those behaviors. His goal is for fewer dogs to wind up relinquished to shelters, where those dogs with “behavior problems” are at higher risk of being euthanized. Dr. Nick believes there are better ways to manage behaviors that drive people to give up their pets, He has set out to scientifically study the problems and their most effective solutions, with the help of other experts in the field.

Your Input Matters!
Does your dog have behavior “issues?” Or are you one of the lucky ones whose dog doesn’t do anything that bothers or disturbs your peace? Either way, it would be great if you could jump on the internet and take the quick study to further understanding of how dogs behave (and misbehave). We know that many of the dogs in shelters are brought there by people who have given up on them, often for particular behaviors. Please join me and take the quick survey from The Center for Canine Behavior Studies.

The Center for Canine Behavior Studies
The CCBS team collaboratively developed the Center’s new canine behavior study, which consists of two phases.  The first phase is now open for dog owner participation. Any dog owner can participate in the first phase of the on-line survey that will remain open until January 15, 2018. The second phase will be a follow up survey of owners with dogs from the first study that had behavior problems.

Tracie HotchnerTracie Hotchner is a nationally acclaimed pet wellness advocate, who wrote THE DOG BIBLE: Everything Your Dog Wants You to Know and THE CAT BIBLE: Everything Your Cat Expects You to Know. She is recognized as the premiere voice for pets and their people on pet talk radio. She continues to produce and host her own Gracie® Award winning NPR show DOG TALK®  (and Kitties, Too!) from Peconic Public Broadcasting in the Hamptons after 9 consecutive years and over 500 shows. She produced and hosted her own live, call-in show CAT CHAT® on the Martha Stewart channel of Sirius/XM for over 7 years until the channel was canceled, when Tracie created her own Radio Pet Lady Network where she produces and co-hosts CAT CHAT® along with 10 other pet talk radio podcasts with top veterinarians and pet experts.

Dog Film Festival - Tracie HotchnerTracie also is the Founder and Director of the annual NY Dog Film Festival, a philanthropic celebration of the love between dogs and their people. Short canine-themed documentary, animated and narrative films from around the world create a shared audience experience that inspires, educates and entertains. With a New York City premiere every October, the Festival then travels around the country, partnering in each location with an outstanding animal welfare organization that brings adoptable dogs to the theater and receives half the proceeds of the ticket sales. Halo was a Founding Sponsor in 2015 and donated 10,000 meals to the beneficiary shelters in every destination around the country in 2016.

Tracie lives in Bennington, Vermont – where the Radio Pet Lady Network studio is based – and where her 12 acres are well-used by her 2-girl pack of lovely, lively rescued Weimaraners, Maisie and Wanda.

Halo Pets

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Table Scraps Do’s & Don’ts For Dogs

Holiday food alert for dogs

At holiday times there are often enticing and bountiful meals, with lots of leftovers. Can your dog share in more than the delicious aromas? That depends – but certainly whatever you share should be about the experience they’ll have of getting a few tasty licks, never in a quantity of food that would add calories or strain their digestive system.

Foods to Never Share with a Dog

Most everyone knows the well-known toxic foods that dogs cannot safely eat even a small amount of: macadamia nuts, grapes, raisins, onions and real dark chocolate. But there are other foods to be cautious about.

* Fat trimmings from meat like lamb, pork and beef (or even poultry) is not good for people or dogs, for whom really fatty foods can lead to health issues like obesity and even pancreatitis.

* Fatty skin from chicken or turkey just adds calories and pounds to a dog – and often upsets digestion because these are so rich.

* Any food in a heavy rich sauce with cream, wine or cheese – those are just too rich for a dog (and maybe you should lighten up on heavily sauced foods for your own health, too!)

* Spicy food can be really cruel to a dog: by the time a dog realizes that Mexican or Indian food is heavily spiced it will have already burned her tongue. it can even cause burning right through her digestive tract.

Healthy “People” Foods to Share with Your Dog After Your Meal (see end note)

* Fish of any kind – especially with the skin (with salmon being high on the list) are rich in omega-3 fatty acids.

* Vegetables of any kind – cooked or raw – but not sauced or buttered. Just as we always want children to “eat their veggies,” the same is true for our dogs. Eating vegetables gives a dog some vitamins (depending on how it has been cooked), but just as important is the dietary fiber and, in most cases, a low-calorie feeling of fullness.

* Leftover tossed salad, as long as it doesn’t have onions (not good for dogs and the odor might also might repel them!) is delightful for most dogs, although some can be picky about the kind of dressing (and yes, you probably need dressing or that “rabbit food” isn’t very interesting at all!)

How to Know if You Are Overdoing Table-Scrap Sharing

* Is your dog putting on weight? Be mindful of amounts you’re sharing. Make sure you aren’t being too generous with your leftovers.

* Limit after-meal sharing to just licking the nearly empty plate (which of course will be going into the high temperature dishwasher afterward!)

* Be thoughtful about actually measuring your dog’s own food – and reduce his calorie intake based on whether you have a heavy hand with leftovers.

* If your dog has begun begging at the table in anticipation of being given some scraps in the kitchen after you’ve finished – then post-meal sharing has to be stopped, at least for awhile.

Good Canine Table Manners Come from Sharing Table Scraps

* It’s fine to let your dogs lick your plates when you’re finished eating, but never feed anything from the table. This is how I’ve trained my dogs forever to lie quietly in the dining room while people are eating.

* By waiting until you take your dishes back into the kitchen before offering leftovers, you teach your dogs to lie quietly during your meal. My dog Maisie actually watches for when I put down my knife and fork, knowing that is the signal I’ve finished eating and it’s “her turn.”

* Once in the kitchen after your finish a meal, remove most everything left on the plates and let the dogs just lick the surfaces, giving them the sensation of having a treat without the calories.

* If you have fine china you are not going to put through the high heat of a dishwasher afterward then do put some actual scraps into the dog’s bowl.

Food is NOT Love!

Just keep a perspective that the most important thing in the world to your dog is her relationship with you. She may drool when she smells the roast turkey, but it is your company and affection and attention which feed her soul. Don’t go overboard on the food – and overdo the rest as much as you like!!

Tracie HotchnerTracie Hotchner is a nationally acclaimed pet wellness advocate, who wrote THE DOG BIBLE: Everything Your Dog Wants You to Know and THE CAT BIBLE: Everything Your Cat Expects You to Know. She is recognized as the premiere voice for pets and their people on pet talk radio. She continues to produce and host her own Gracie® Award winning NPR show DOG TALK®  (and Kitties, Too!) from Peconic Public Broadcasting in the Hamptons after 9 consecutive years and over 500 shows. She produced and hosted her own live, call-in show CAT CHAT® on the Martha Stewart channel of Sirius/XM for over 7 years until the channel was canceled, when Tracie created her own Radio Pet Lady Network where she produces and co-hosts CAT CHAT® along with 10 other pet talk radio podcasts with top veterinarians and pet experts.

Dog Film Festival - Tracie HotchnerTracie also is the Founder and Director of the annual NY Dog Film Festival, a philanthropic celebration of the love between dogs and their people. Short canine-themed documentary, animated and narrative films from around the world create a shared audience experience that inspires, educates and entertains. With a New York City premiere every October, the Festival then travels around the country, partnering in each location with an outstanding animal welfare organization that brings adoptable dogs to the theater and receives half the proceeds of the ticket sales. Halo was a Founding Sponsor in 2015 and donated 10,000 meals to the beneficiary shelters in every destination around the country in 2016.

Tracie lives in Bennington, Vermont – where the Radio Pet Lady Network studio is based – and where her 12 acres are well-used by her 2-girl pack of lovely, lively rescued Weimaraners, Maisie and Wanda.

Halo Pets

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A New Holiday Tradition: Making Our Own Ornaments

A New Holiday Tradition: Making Our Own Ornaments

Thank you Moose Toys for sponsoring this post. Get crafty with your kiddo and make “ooniements” with Oonies by Moose Toys this holiday season!

I remember how thrilled I was about Essley’s first Christmas, which took place when she was just a few days shy of turning one. (Her birthday is December 28th.) I was indescribably excited about having a child with whom I could share the magic of the holiday season. Everything wonderful about it was amplified. And every year since then, it’s only gotten better. She and her little brother make the holidays so full of wonder and light! This year has been especially fun because Essley is now at an age where she is remembering holiday activities we did in previous years and asking to do them again, which means we’re able to establish traditions. When it comes to enjoying the holidays, I wholeheartedly feel that it’s traditions that make them the most special.

A couple of weeks ago, I was talking to Essley about traditions, what they meant, and which ones we’d already done this holiday season. I told her that I thought it would be fun to make a new tradition that we could continue into future years, and asked her to think about what she’d like to do. Unfortunately, her first choice (taking Santa’s reindeer to the swimming pool, in the snow, while wearing our bathing suits) didn’t pan out (I know; bummer). But her second idea sounded pretty great to me – making our own holiday ornaments for the tree.

To this day, my favorite ornaments on my mom’s Christmas tree are those that my sister and I had made. Looking at each one instantly invokes a flooding of the most treasured memories, and that’s just something you can’t beat with store bought ornaments. I honestly couldn’t think of a better tradition to start with my Essley this year.

I had actually just received the coolest craft kit from Moose Toys called Oonies, and when Essley suggested ornament making, I instantly thought about how perfect that would be for making our own ornaments (or as Essley ended up calling them, “ooniements.”). So we put on the holiday music station, poured a couple of glasses of soy eggnog, and got to work. And we had the best time. Oonies are seriously the coolest way to create, you guys. To make them, Essley just takes an Oonies pellet, places it in the inflator, and we watch it magically grow in to an Oonie. She thought this was profoundly thrilling. She was mesmerized. What I personally love the most about them is that the Oonies stick to each other, so there’s no mess. Did you hear that? No mess. With a four year old who is crafting. It was so easy and fun for us to make little animals and a snowman together, and to immediately get to place them on the tree without any wait time. We’ll definitely be using our Oonies to make tree ornaments again holiday season, but I know we’ll be creating with them throughout the year as well. So fun.

I actually feel emotional looking at these photos and thinking about how special it was to take this time together to create these ornaments and start a new tradition that our family will always be able to look forward to. The best.

What holiday traditions do you love the most? Have any of your made your own ornaments this year?

Thank you for supporting the brands that help make Bubby and Bean possible. I was selected for this opportunity as a member of CLEVER and the content and opinions expressed here are all my own.

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Bubby and Bean ::: Living Creatively

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What I’m Wearing Now: December

Casual Winter Style Staples

1. Blush Blanket Scarf, H&M  // 2. Set of 3 Tassel Earrings, Revolia  //  3Fine Knit Sweater, H&M //  4.   Beaded Chain Bracelet, Madewell   //  5. Jacquard-knit Sweater, H&M (ON SALE for $ 14.99!)  //  6. Silver Hoop Earrings, H&M  //  7. Loveland Wrap in Cargo Green, prAna  // 8. Splash Gabi Sneakers, Minnetonka  (ON SALE)  //  9. Skinny Low Jeans in Black, H&M  // 10. Classic Short Boots in Chestnut, Ugg  //  11. Fan Tassel Earrings, Amazon (Only $ 7.99!)  //  12. Chuck Taylor Low Tops, Converse  //  13Lily Tote Diaper Bag, Newlie  

I was hoping that this post would be a perfect mix of cold weather attire and all of the fun, sunshine-y pieces I wore in the Dominican Republic. But, alas, as you probably already know from my excessive wining about it, four hours before I was set to leave for the airport Essley started puking. So I got to stay home with a sick kid. Good times. Needless to say, all of those pretty gauzy dresses and cut-offs and sunglasses I packed went right back into storage. And that means that the final What I’m Wearing Now post for 2017 doesn’t look all that much different from last month. But that’s life, and clothes are just clothes, and soon enough spring will be here (or that’s what I like to tell myself, anyway).

I’ve once again been having fun with layers, totally over-wearing UGG Boots (which I once was convinced were like omg so suburban mom, and well, here I am), these jeans (which as of the time I type this out are on sale for $ 19!), and a whole lot of sweaters. I’ve also been consisting wearing these tassel earrings, everyday and with everything. They’re really long but with a swift cut of the scissors they were the perfect length. I’m kind of obsessed.

One thing that doesn’t look quite like any of the casual pieces you see here that I will be wearing this month is my New Year’s Eve dress. I don’t have a photo because it’s actually a few years old, but it’s blush and full of sequins and completely over the top. In other words, it’s perfect. I’m really excited to wear it in Denver on the 31st.

I’ll post my usual full year-in-review What I’m Wearing Now Post in early January. And it will be interesting to see what I wear next month, considering we move on the 4th and we’ll be doing a lot of painting and other house stuff while our stuff is in boxes. I’m cool with that though. I’ve never been one to complain about a leggings and old t-shirt uniform.

What have you been wearing this month?


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Bubby and Bean ::: Living Creatively

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Saturday Survey: Dogs in the Workplace

Earlier today, I posted some considerations about whether or not employers should allow dogs to come to work with employees. Has the situation come up at your workplace? How was it handled? Until next time, Good day, and good dog!


Doggies.com Dog Blog

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Thank you for this honest assessment. I am a wolf…

Thank you for this honest assessment. I am a wolfdog rescuer/sanctuary owner and sadly, we are in no position to help with 60 in our sanctuary now.

Education is what will save the true wolfdogs AND keep bad backyard breeders from making money.

I helped in Katrina with Pitties, and I share your pain. Prayers up for the innocents that will loose their lives.

www.fullmoonfarm.org – We rescued Karma – https://www.facebook.com/karmathemythunderstood/
BAD RAP Blog

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Did a dog really drop a deuce at 10 Downing Street?

The Poodle (and Dog) Blog

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Being An Older Mom: Stereotypes, Compliments, and Why I Feel Empowered

Being An Older Mom: Stereotypes, Compliments, and Why I Feel Empowered

This post is in partnership with RoC®, but all opinions are my own. Thank you for supporting the brands that help make Bubby and Bean possible. 

I had my first child at 39, and my second at 41. I am now what is considered to be an “older mom” of very young kids. My 20s and early 30s were spent traveling, moving all over the U.S. (I lived in 9 states in a 12 year period), and focusing on my career as an eco-friendly clothing designer. I knew that I probably (although not certainly) wanted kids someday, but it wasn’t a priority. And then, I turned 38, and suddenly it was. I knew that having a child later in life would likely come with judgment, but being aware of the possibility didn’t make it any easier when it happened.

The majority of my friends who wanted to be parents waited to have children as well, but outside of that circle, I was given all sorts of opinions when I did get pregnant – from relatives to strangers to the health care system itself, which automatically labeled me as “advanced maternal age” and presented me with an abundance of extra tests and doctor appointments. While more and more people are waiting until later to become mothers and/or fathers than in the past, the truth is that most people who choose to be parents still give birth or adopt in their 20s or early 30s. There is often a stigma attached to older parents, who are assumed to be less equipped for the job because of their ages. About a year ago in fact, I stumbled upon a stereotype-laden opinion piece online about how older parents usually don’t have the energy to keep up with their kids, often have less in common with their kids and therefore trouble establishing good relationships with them, and even have a greater potential to feel challenges at social gatherings with other parents because they will have less to talk about and look physically older than the other parents. Yep. It said that.

Being An Older Mom: Stereotypes, Compliments, and Why I Feel Empowered
Being An Older Mom: Stereotypes, Compliments, and Why I Feel Empowered

I’d be lying if I said that article didn’t get to me on some levels. Shortly after reading it, I was at one of my 3 year old daughter’s activities, and I started talking with another mom. We had a great conversation about our children that led to discussing our pregnancies and birthing experiences. I said something about my “advanced maternal age” label while pregnant, and she asked me how old I was. When I told her, she said, “Wow, I would have guessed you were much younger. You look really good for your age.” For your age. I know she was trying to compliment me, and I thanked her, but my mind immediately wandered back to that article. That night, I sat up in bed trying to read a book, but I kept thinking about my conversation with the other mother, and that awful article, and what it meant to be an older-than-most mom who didn’t simply look good, she just maybe looked good for her age. I mean, would that apply to all aspects of being an early-40s parent to little ones? Would I be considered active with my kids for my age? Would I have a good understanding of my children’s generation for my age? Would I be a good parent in general for my age?

I was convinced I was going to wake up the following morning riddled with anxiety, but the opposite happened. I woke up feeling empowered. I mean, seriously, why would I allow myself to feel bad about my appearance or parenting skills because of outdated stigmas attached to getting older? I’m doing great as a parent, and my age – old or young – has nothing to do with it. I am actively involved in my kids’ activities and my daughter’s school. I keep up with my children and have lots of hands on playtime with them, even after working all day. I maintain a healthy social life with friends, including parents of all ages. And I focus on taking care of myself and appearance – I attempt to put myself together well when I dress each day, I eat healthy foods and regularly exercise, and I use the best skin care, like my beloved RoC® RETINOL CORREXION MAX Daily Hydration Créme. (I love what actress Thandie Newton says about it: “I am proud to participate in the mission of RoC® and it’s For Your Age campaign as this Brand understands and celebrates every way a person wants to feel, and how they want to look.” Amen!) I have zero regrets about waiting to have kids until later. I personally needed to have the life experiences I had when I was younger to get to where I am now, and I am consistently using those experiences to improve my parenting skills. That whole cliche of age just being a number is truth, guys. I consider myself to be a young mother despite being in my early 40s. And I’ll say it again. I’m doing great.

Being An Older Mom: Stereotypes, Compliments, and Why I Feel Empowered
Being An Older Mom: Stereotypes, Compliments, and Why I Feel Empowered

Since this occurrence, I’ve continued to think more and more about how compliments given to women – moms or otherwise – ending in “for your age” are so prevalent in our society, and the potentially negative impact they could have. And while the giver of these compliments most often means well, the implications are that if a woman does look her age (middle-aged or otherwise), she doesn’t look good. What if you are 40 and you genuinely look 40? Does that mean there is something wrong with you? Why should beauty be defined by how old we look? And deep down, does being consistently told she look great for your age have a detrimental effect on a woman’s self esteem? RoC® actually did a study on this, where they partnered with Wakefield Research on a nationwide survey of 1,000 women aged 40 and up. The results showed that 82% of women have been told that they look “great for their age” in the past year (and most on average of every 6 weeks!), most women would rather not be given a compliment at all than get one ending with “for your age,” and that 87% of women feel that society expects women to act their age, but to look younger. This isn’t right. We shouldn’t have to feel that we look any way, because of our ages, or for our ages. Beauty should not be determined by age, period. (To learn more about the study, click here.)

We can change this way of thinking though. We can. I strongly feel that we, as moms of any age and as women in general, need to take the initiative to band together and reevaluate how beauty and age are connected – beginning with removing phrases like “for your age” from our vocabulary. And this can extend beyond beauty to success in parenting and/or careers as well. Today’s woman is genuinely the healthiest, most active/successful/influential of all women throughout history, and the fact that society tells us we should still be longing for our youth represents a huge problem. We as women can be anything, and that should have nothing to do with how old we are! I truly believe this, and as an “older mom” who is loving (and doing a great job of) being a parent, I hope I am proof of this.

Being An Older Mom: Stereotypes, Compliments, and Why I Feel Empowered
Being An Older Mom: Stereotypes, Compliments, and Why I Feel Empowered
Being An Older Mom: Stereotypes, Compliments, and Why I Feel Empowered

I vow to continue to work hard to be strong, successful, confident, and beautiful on my own terms. I’ll keep dressing in clothes I love and that I personally find to be chic or stylish, regardless of what department I find them in or if magazines tell me I should be dressing older to match my age. I’ll take care of my body by eating healthy, nutritious foods that fuel me and exercising everyday. I’ll take care of my skin by using my RoC® RETINOL CORREXION MAX Daily Hydration Créme, which offers a powerful retinol formula for well hydrated, beautiful skin, quickly moisturizes to deeply hydrate skin for 24 hours, and is clinically proven to visibly reduce fine lines and wrinkles in 1 week. I’ll continue to work hard, enjoy what I do for a living, and feel good about helping to support my family. And I’ll remain an active mom who enjoys keeping up with 2 littles ones, and is happily involved in their playtime, activities, and school.

Being An Older Mom: Stereotypes, Compliments, and Why I Feel Empowered

Whether you’re an older mom like me, a “middle aged” career rockstar, a strong woman who is past what society seems to consider youthful, or just a righteous babe in general, (or all of these things!), I would so love to hear your stories of shattering age stereotypes and feeling strong and beautiful regardless of your number of years. Feel free to comment below, email me, or DM me on Instagram. We’re in this together, and should feel empowered together. Thank you for letting me share my story with you!

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Bubby and Bean ::: Living Creatively

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Some Thoughts On My Daughter

Dog Bone Sugar Cookies

In 3 weeks, Essley turns 4. I won’t get into the whole cliche of how quickly time passes with kids or how fast they grow, but I will say that I am having a difficult time grasping the fact that this little baby to whom I seemingly just gave birth is now so far from infancy. I look at her and she seems so grown up you guys. She is bright, independent, creative, and kind, an incredible teacher, and while admittedly sometimes a complete a-hole, a really wonderful human being. I talk about the kids from time to time around here, but the more emotional posts have been about Emmett and what he’s been through with his epilepsy journey. Today I felt inspired to pop in and just say something about how much I adore my daughter. I am so grateful for her.

Any other mamas of daughters, do you feel me here? Aren’t they just the best? (Tied with the sons of course.) Oh, and thanks for allowing me to express the occasional gushing of emotions around here guys. Gotta keep it real now and then.

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Bubby and Bean ::: Living Creatively

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